What Is Cannabigerol (CBG)?

Cannabigerol (CBG) is a type of cannabinoid derived from young cannabis plants. Unlike its more famous cousins, THC and CBD, CBG is found in lower concentrations in most strains of cannabis. However, it’s gaining attention for its potential therapeutic benefits.

Understanding The Difference: CBG vs. CBD

CBG and CBD are both non-psychoactive cannabinoids, meaning they won’t get you high. They both interact with the same receptors in the body, the CB1 and CB2 receptors, which are part of the endocannabinoid system. This system helps regulate various functions in the body, including sleep, mood, appetite, and immune response.

While CBD has been extensively studied and is known for its potential therapeutic benefits, CBG is less well-known and research into its effects is still in the early stages. However, preliminary studies suggest that CBG might have its own set of health benefits.

The Most Important Thing to Know About CBG

CBG is derived from young cannabis plants, which contain higher amounts of this cannabinoid than plants that are fully developed. As the plant matures, most of the CBG is converted into other cannabinoids, primarily THC and CBD. This is why most cannabis strains contain less than 1% CBG.

Like CBD, CBG may have a number of potential therapeutic benefits. It appears to have a positive effect on cell viability and may protect certain cells from the toxic effects of excitatory neurotransmitters. However, more research is needed to fully understand these effects and their potential benefits.

CBG Concentration in Plants

CBG is derived from young cannabis plants, which contain higher amounts of this cannabinoid than plants that are fully developed. As the plant matures, most of the CBG is converted into other cannabinoids, primarily THC and CBD. This is why most cannabis strains contain less than 1% CBG.

How CBG Works

CBG is processed by the body’s endocannabinoid system, a complex network of receptors and neurotransmitters that helps regulate various functions in the body, including sleep, mood, appetite, and immune response. CBG, like other cannabinoids, interacts with the CB1 and CB2 receptors in this system.

What is CBG Good For?

While research into CBG is still in its early stages, preliminary studies suggest that it might have a number of potential therapeutic benefits. These include:

Anti-inflammatory effects: A 2018 study found that CBG can reduce inflammation by inhibiting the production of a specific enzyme that triggers an inflammatory response in the body.

Neuroprotective effects: A 2015 study found that CBG may protect neurons in mice with Huntington’s disease, a neurodegenerative disorder.

Appetite stimulation: A 2016 study found that CBG can stimulate appetite in rats, suggesting it might help people with conditions that cause a loss of appetite, like cancer or HIV.

Benefits of CBG

Skincare Benefits

CBG may have potential benefits for skin health. A 2020 study found that CBG can inhibit the proliferation of human keratinocyte cells, suggesting it might be useful in treating conditions like psoriasis.

Mental Benefits

While more research is needed, some studies suggest that CBG might have antidepressant and anti-anxiety effects. A 2010 study found that CBG can block serotonin receptors, suggesting it might help reduce anxiety and depression.

Physical Benefits

CBG may also have physical benefits. A 2014 study found that CBG can reduce intraocular pressure, suggesting it might be useful in treating conditions like glaucoma.

How to Use CBG

CBG can be consumed in several ways, including oils, tinctures, and edibles. The method of consumption can affect how quickly you feel the effects and how long they last. For instance, oils and tinctures are typically placed under the tongue and absorbed directly into the bloodstream, providing faster effects. Edibles, on the other hand, need to be digested first, so the effects take longer to kick in but also last longer.

Side Effects of CBG

Like other cannabinoids, CBG is generally considered safe and well-tolerated. However, it can cause some side effects, especially at high doses. These may include dry mouth, sleepiness, and increased appetite. It’s always a good idea to start with a low dose and gradually increase it until you find the dose that gives you the desired effects without unwanted side effects.

Does it interact with any medications?

While CBG is generally considered safe, it can interact with certain medications, including some types of anti-epileptic drugs. If you’re taking any medication, it’s important to talk to your doctor before starting CBG.

Choosing a CBG product

When choosing a CBG product, it’s important to look for products that are third-party tested. This means they’ve been tested by an independent lab to verify their potency and purity. You should also look for products made from organically grown hemp, like the ones available at Dutch Natural Healing.

In conclusion, while research into CBG is still in its early stages, preliminary studies suggest that it might have a number of potential therapeutic benefits. As with any supplement, it’s important to talk to your doctor before starting CBG, especially if you’re taking any other medications.


Disclaimer: 

Qrius does not provide medical advice

The Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Act, 1985 (NDPS Act) outlaws the recreational use of cannabis products in India

CBD oil manufactured under a license issued by the Drugs and Cosmetics Act, 1940 can be legally used in India, for medicinal purposes, only with a prescription, subject to specific conditions. Kindly refer to the same here for the legalities of use in India

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